Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

 

Everything about Santa Clara 1728 in Lisbon, makes you want to cry (in appreciation). From the rich historical elements retained by local architecture practice, Aires Mateus, to the interplay of the selected materials that feel simple and beautiful. The building, originally constructed in 1728, had undergone many incarnations, additions and transformations. The trick, of course, was to take the many construction periods to assimilate into the final product that resembles a holistic contemporary version of itself.

This luxury hotel has all the beauty and architectural depth of a grand old dame mixed with the warmth and clean lines of a contemporary architectural addition. The material selection is exquisite. The many bathrooms on the property are expertly finished with a perfect eye for tile selection and statement piece bathtubs and washbasins.

Nothing competes for attention in this hotel. All of the elements sit in harmony with each other, from the furniture selection and lighting to the calming palette of cream and beige and natural stones and linens.

 

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

Santa Clara 1728 in Lisboa, Portugal by Aires Mateus | Yellowtrace

 

The architect’s goal was to construct a building that reflected the experience of living in a city. They achieved this aim, not by simply reproducing the more traditional elements of design but by thinking outside the box as to what city living meant for Lisbon is this day and age. “(We sought out) a recombination of elements, materials, atmospheres and proportions, to bring back this idea of living,” said the architects.

City living it may well be, but one can’t help feeling that you’ve been transported back in time to a wealthy holiday home, one nestled in the mountains or somewhere by the sea. The luxurious finishes and the perfect restraint in the application of materials and furnishing are imbued with a feeling of exceptional style and culture.

“(It is) a plain architecture, that combines few elements, while striving for quality in the use of real materials. An idea of authenticity and, therefore, an idea of timelessness,” explained the design team.

 

 


[Images courtesy of Aires Mateus. Photography by Juan Rodriguez.]

 

About The Author

Susanna McArdle

Susanna has a background in Interior Architecture and a passion for writing. Based in Sydney, she has worked both in Asia and Australia designing. An avid writer, it’s hard to know what she prefers more, stringing words together or creating spaces. But one thing she does know, is that she loves doing the both together.

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