The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

 

Brooklyn has long been known for its trend setting ways, from the birth of the hipster, to the artisanal movement. Now this eclectic and uber cool New York borough is host to one of the most stunning co-working spaces to make it’s way on the block.

The New Work Project is a private members workspace designed by The New Design Project for Brooklyn’s thriving hub of entrepreneurs and solopreneurs, located in one of Williamsburg’s most iconic buildings.

If you can afford to rent some of this hot real estate, you’ll find it on 97 N 10th St in Williamsburg, in a former foundry, most recently home to Vice Media. More a hotel lobby than your regular shared laptop community, this stunning co-habitational office is the latest venture by former bankers, husband and wife team, James Davison and Fanny Abbes.

“The New Work Project is a design-led, service-oriented workspace that sits at the crossroads of hospitality and co-working,” said the design team. And hospitality it screams loud and clear, or in this case, softly and sophisticatedly. From the marble clad, high working bench reminiscent of an elegant wine bar, the stunning brass lighting from Parachilna, to the bespoke furniture, it all feels very Upper East Side.

There’s been a deft hand with a vision that’s painted the walls a striking black to offset the linear stretch of grey veined marble and pale oak flooring. The subtle use of linear fluorescent lighting, geometrically wrapping from the ceiling down the wall, is the perfect juxtaposition to the decorative style 1930 brass and white globe pendants.

 

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

The New Work Project Private Members Workspace in Williamsburg, NYC | Yellowtrace

 

It has all the attributes we attribute to good co-working spaces – open workstation areas, communal lounge areas, meeting rooms and private telephone booths. “Members are able to work from lounge areas, assigned gallery desks or private studios, and have access to high workstations, break out areas and conference rooms,” said the designers.

But it’s the way each of these areas have been treated that really takes this co-working space from it’s original roots of low key, chilled out office vibe to something far more dapper and grand.

“The interior design pairs mid-century pieces with custom furniture by The New Design Project, black and brass accent lighting, and showcases our collaboration with local designers Eskayel and J.M. Szymanski,” commented the design team.

It has an air of old Hollywood about it. It’s a space you go to bump into the likes of the new Andy Warhol and up and coming producers and suave creative sorts. You won’t find any fake grass here or overstuffed beanbags. No, if you want to make it in New York, you’ll be wanting to stuff your artisanal bread into your hand-woven, hessian backpack and smarten yourself up. For this luxe space is the type that only pours Old Fashioned Manhattan’s in a classy cocktail glass. And frankly any less would simply never do.

 

Related Post: Stories On Design // Coworking Spaces.

 


[Images courtesy of The New Work Project. Photography by Will Ellis & sketches by Paul Tuller.]

 

About The Author

Susanna McArdle

Susanna has a background in Interior Architecture and a passion for writing. Based in Sydney, she has worked both in Asia and Australia designing. An avid writer, it’s hard to know what she prefers more, stringing words together or creating spaces. But one thing she does know, is that she loves doing the both together.

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