Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

 

This simple yet stunning home at the base of Grouse Mountain in Vancouver, Canada is a joyous marriage of materials. Light-filled, spacious and stunning; this renovation for two history professors aptly pays homage to traditional and new materials allowing them to age and weather over time. The project was designed and constructed by husband and wife duo David and Susan Scott who make up Scott and Scott Architects. You may recognise this other gem that we featured, the very cool Vancouver restaurant Torafuku with its clean lines and killer use of leather and fabrics. This dwelling however is all about timbers and that incredible marble kitchen counter. Solid, sexy and oh so fine!

The original 1950s post and beam house was modest in scale but had well-proportioned rooms and a strong connection to its luscious wooded surrounds. The renovation and restoration of the 150sqm home involved minimal changes to the basic configuration and the floor plan was mostly untouched. David Scott explains that their design approach was to accentuate the qualities of the existing house and to “increase the depth in which light penetrated to the living spaces”. This was achieved by replacing the enclosed stairs with open steel and timber “which allows light from the second floor hall window to connect with the ground floor.”

 

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

Mid-Century North Vancouver House Renovation by Scott & Scott Architects | Yellowtrace

 

The architects worked with friends, architectural students and artisans during construction employing traditional building and finishing methods. They personally applied lye wash to douglas fir beams and coated the structural decking with a pigment oil. According Scott, “these applied finishes allow for a brighter space while not erasing the history of the home.” Douglas fir is an integral part of the interior and it is integrated throughout. Two concealed storage blocks made of douglas fir plywood divide the ground floor plan and create maximum open space for the kitchen, entry and living areas. This predominant material is used in various ways yet appears so different in terms of colour, pattern and texture. This creates a lovely layering of pale, warm and deeply rich tones.

The use of marble evolved out of kitchen design discussions with the clients. Their shared desire was to create a kitchen “that would be the last that the house would have.” The result was the installation of a solid marble counter which was sculpted from a block selected from the Hisnet Inlet quarry on Vancouver Island. Strong and receptive to aging, this marble marvel weighs in at 800 kilograms and is miraculously supported by solid ash open shelving. Installation was no easy feat. The counter was delivered on site, unloaded on a crane, placed a rolling cart and finally positioned into place with only a few millimetres of tolerance on each end. Talk about stressful! Although logistically challenging, the counter is a wonderful piece of craftsmanship and design and sits wonderfully within the home. Marble-lous work Scott and Scott Architects! (Sorry, you know I had to go there…)

 

Related Post: Torafuku Modern Asian Eatery by Scott & Scott Architects.

 


[Images courtesy of Scott & Scott Architects.]

 

About The Author

Fenina Acance
Contributor

Architecting away in Melbourne, Fenina is a shameless fashion, art and design fanatic who loves defying the relentless Melbournian uniform of black on black on black. Often spotted strutting a boisterous mix of pattern and colour, her eclectic love for the bold, raw and textured fuels her passion for design and contemporary art. When not indulging in Cy Twombly’s sensitive scribbles or Serra’s evocative sculptural forms, her love for everything Italian consumes the rest of her time. Whether it’s the language, design or food (especially food), Fenina is obsessed!

2 Responses

  1. Kenneth Mason

    The oversized planking and lighter colors used lend an air of age of history. The modern glass box basic structure keeps its modern feel and edge. Would enjoy seeing some older furnishings used. wonderful.

    Reply

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