Located on a rural site in Japan’s mountainous Shizuoka Prefecture, Tokyo-based architect Issei Suma has designed a cluster of tent-like structures which accommodate elderly residents of a small Japanese community. Called Jikka, the small complex is made up of five pavilions, containing facilities such as a spiral pool, bedroom, dining and kitchen.

The buildings are designed for two women in their 60s – one a social worker and the other a cook. The 100sqm complex functions as both their home and a workplace. Under the duo’s guidance, Jikka facilitates food delivery service for the elderly, while offering nursing care to those with disabilities.

With striking pointed roofs, the structures have a tent like appearance. The square footprint of the buildings overlap with one another, thereby providing access from one pavilion to the next. Externally, the buildings are clad in timber panels, while the interior provides a contrast with concrete floors and walls, and painted timber ceilings.

 

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[Images courtesy of Issei Suma, via Dezeen. Photography by Takumi Ota.]

 

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2 Responses

  1. kennethmason1kapm

    HOPE IT DOESN’T SNOW HERE. NOT ONLY DOES THERE SEEM TO BE A LACK OF INSULATION, BUT SNOW SLIDING OFF THE ROOFS WOULD HAVE TO BE REMOVED FROM ENTRANCE WAYS AND OTHER DOORS. NOT AN EASY JOB FOR ELDERLY WOMEN. WONDERING IF THE HEIGHT OF THE ROOFS COULD BE CHANGED, NOT QUITE AS STEEP AS SHOWN– MIGHT BE EASIER TO HEAT AND COOL.

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