House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

 

The expression goes: ‘More is more’ and in this instance, Tomomi Kito Architects have shown us just that, without holding back on the abundance of quality woodwork. From luxe wooden flooring to cabinetry and a charming wooden-clad spiral staircase, this 1970s Japanese house resembles a timber wonderland, renovated and set to accommodate a family of four generations in the bustling city of Tokyo.

While the core of the project’s focus was to create a space that promotes a connection between all generations, the team also worked with dedication to improve natural daylight, ventilation and the flow of shared spaces across the two levels. The extent of the renovation went as far as removing a total of twenty columns to achieve an open plan house. Using lauan plywood and cedar wood as its primary hero materials, all rooms have been seamlessly linked to exhibit warm tones and enhance the existing structure. Supporting beams and plywood add touches of balance, resistance and an airy feel that envelopes the whole space overall. Unadorned white walls echo a clean, contemporary aesthetic taking minimalism and restraint to another level.

Metal partitions have been incorporated instead of hard-walls to further allow natural light and accelerate airflow throughout. The space has clearly been structurally reinforced with supporting beams not only enhancing function but adding a form to the second-floor common area and kitchen. One aspect is clear: Tomomi Kito Architects have done a superb job of taking advantage of existing windows to maximise daylight and ventilation, as well as creating open-plan spaces to enhance communication among family members, making this unique revamp a true success.

 

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

House For Four Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates | Yellowtrace

 

Founded in 2014, Tomomi Kito’s design approach is based on the respect for and integration of the nature of a site including its climate, topographic environmental conditions and the activities of the building’s residents. And that’s exactly what they delivered in their first project; with their client being a young couple, who had the wife’s parents, grandmother and their young son living together.

From wood floors to catenary-shaped ceilings, which ultimately became a distinguishing feature of the house, this project oozes flair and simplicity, while still serving the complex objective of connecting multiple generations under one roof. Whichever way we look at this refurbishment, there is no denying that the classic beauty and multi-functional quality of wood has added longevity and versatility to the overall interior space, defining its entire look and feel.

A true wooden wonderland bridging the generational gap in style!

 

 


[Images courtesy of Tomomi Kito Architect & Associates. Photography by Satoshi Shigeta.]

 

About The Author

Stana Krndija

Stana is a freelance interior designer working and living in Melbourne. Having graduated from CATC Design School in 2013, Stana has worked on various residential projects to deliver functional and aesthetic interiors for her clients. Pursuing two careers, her creative side also comes with a geek chic factor, currently working as a senior systems engineer in IT and maintaining one dynamic schedule. Committed to her weekend adventures, Stana’s alter ego sways between foodie/fashion fanatic and photographer of inner city dwellings and architecture. Exploring hospitality and retail design by shamelessly indulging in ricotta hotcakes at her favourite weekend haunts, followed by a spot of shopping for that sleek and minimal Melbournian style (courtesy of Scandinavian influences), regular travel is her gateway to new inspirations.

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