House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

 

Seville‘s reputation as a sunny Spanish holiday destination belies the less-than-ideal state of its central architecture. Though beautiful in its history, years of overbuilding have left a jumble of crowded and decaying structures, occasionally punctuated by patches of greenery and recent refurbishments.

Architects Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González sought to restore one such historical block as a home for themselves and their two adult children. In order to create some much needed open space, they built the home around an interior courtyard, divided into two main sections with living arrangements spread across four storey’s, allowing for independent family living. There are even two separate kitchens so that parents and children can separate and come together as they please — the best of both worlds.

An aged steel spiral staircase winds up across all four levels, its sculptural form prominent behind the full height glass façade that encases it. The double north-south facade allows crossed ventilation and sunlight, a rare luxury in the densely packed historical centre. The courtyard is flush with the ground floor living rooms, with full height glass doors that open up to create the feeling of one expansive, indoor-outdoor space.

 

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

House in Seville, Spain by Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González | Yellowtrace

 

In an effort to reclaim as much greenery as possible, previously lost amongst the city environment, trees and vines are included on every level, planted in the courtyard, crawling across the courtyard wall, and spread across the rooftop garden. The architects specifically chose deciduous trees, bringing a permanent sense of oneness with the environment to the house as the plants change with the seasons. Preserved timber beams and a rustic shuttered window in one kitchen are the only interior hints at the home’s previously traditional architectural style.

Paved with intentional unevenness, the stone courtyard contrasts the sleek, stainless steel and glass facades that enclose it. Facing the street, the architects maintained a traditional white rendered façade so as not to clash with their surroundings. It’s as though the contemporary oasis within is their little secret.

 

 


[Images courtesy of Harald Schönegger and Inmaculada González. Photography by Fernando Alda.]

 

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