Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

 

This extraordinary circa 1900’s Belgian residence has undergone many different incarnations. It was originally built for an aristocrat. Some half a decade later it was carved up and turned into offices, complete with polystyrene tiled ceilings and a conspicuous absence of any kitchen or proper bathrooms. But then again, that’s what gets the juices flowing, isn’t it? The desire to restore, rejuvenate and reinvent.

In this case, for the superstar French interior designer Pierre Yovanovitch, there was less of the restore, and more of the reinvent. The only element of the original house remaining is the street frontage, resplendent in its original brick façade.

Yovanovitch completely redesigned the interior of the home. A stunning full-height picture window for the kitchen, an arresting sculptural spiral staircase, rising three floors skyward and crowned with a geometric stained-glass skylight.

 

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

 

Yovanovitch favours the artisan approach – his belief is that the only way to make sure a space is not sterile is by employing the deft hand of the truly creative and inspired craftsmen. He favours bespoke joinery crafted by master carpenters and furnishings by 20th-century Scandinavian masters like Axel Einar Hjorth and Paavo Tynell. Yovanovitch is in his element when employing understated materials, walnut bookshelves built into the curved walls of the library, a travertine fireplace in the living room and patinated steel sheets that cover the walls in the dining room.

His clients, a family with four adult sons were very effusive in their brief for the house to be entertaining friendly. Their desire to put living rooms and dining rooms into the same space caused some consternation for Yovanovitch. He prefers his rooms to have specific functions, not to meld into a soup of multiple usages. But isn’t that the ultimate challenge of the designer? To take a brief which makes you uncomfortable and to produce, what can only be described, as a climatic result.

 

Related: Chalet in the Swiss Alps by Pierre Yovanovitch.

 

Early 20thCentury Home in Belgium Transformed by Pierre Yovanovitch | Yellowtrace

 


[Images courtesy of Pierre Yovanovitch and Architectural Digest. Photography by Jose Manuel Alorda.]

 

About The Author

Susanna McArdle

Susanna has a background in Interior Architecture and a passion for writing. Based in Sydney, she has worked both in Asia and Australia designing. An avid writer, it’s hard to know what she prefers more, stringing words together or creating spaces. But one thing she does know, is that she loves doing the both together.

One Response

  1. trendoffice

    What a kitchen! Great design and so impressive. I wish I could see the rest of this space. But I wonder why to deprive the owners the comfort of communicating from the kitchen with the rest of the family that are in the livingroom?

    Reply

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