Le Corbusier’s Paintings Exhibited in a Modernist Villa Stenersen in Oslo | Yellowtrace
La pêcheuse d’huitres, 1935. Photo by Pernille Sandberg.

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Exhibited in a Modernist Villa Stenersen in Oslo | Yellowtrace
Le déjeuner près du pare, 1928. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP.

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Exhibited in a Modernist Villa Stenersen in Oslo | Yellowtrace
Trois figures de femme et chien. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP.

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Exhibited in a Modernist Villa Stenersen in Oslo | Yellowtrace
Trois baigneuses, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP.

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Exhibited in a Modernist Villa Stenersen in Oslo | Yellowtrace
Le Corbusier & Yvonne Gallis. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP.

 

Many associate Le Corbusier with the idea of the house as a machine for living – or with radical urban plans involving high-rise housing blocks and efficient traffic systems. He was obsessed with the machine. And yet his fascination with nature had a significant impact on his work, as both an architect and a painter.

Currently on show at the extraordinary modernist home in Oslo, Villa Stenersen, ‘Le Corbusier by the Sea’ focuses on the famed architect’s life between 1926–36. Each summer for a decade, he visited the Bassin d’Arcachon, a bay on the southwest coast of France. It was a place for recreation, far from the urban distractions of Paris.

“I am drawn to places where people live naturally,” he wrote in a letter to his mother in 1932. “Le Piquey is full of life that is healthy, calm and to scale: to a human scale… This is what civilisations destroy, plunging people into artifice and misfortune.”

 

 

Le Corbusier tirelessly sketched whatever he found on the beach: boats, shells, cones, driftwood and stones. Later, back home, he abstracted this subject matter in his paintings.

With reproductions of sketches, written notes, photographs and paintings, the exhibition presents a less-known aspect of Le Corbusier as a dreamy and humorous person.

 

‘Le Corbusier by the Sea’ runs until 16 December 2018 at Villa Stenersen, Oslo. The exhibition is a collaboration with Professor Emeritus Tim Benton and the artist Bruno Hubert.

 

 


[Images courtesy of Nasjonalmuseet. Photography by Pernille Sandberg.]

 

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Dana Tomić Hughes
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Dana is an award-winning interior designer living in Sydney, Australia. With an unhealthy passion for design, Dana commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier design events, enables Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Design Strategy, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places & experiences.

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