DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

 

Each piece is intriguing. It’s as though some supernatural geologist’s knife has cut through a slice of the ocean, as well as the ocean floor and the underlying earth’s substrate rock. And then, as if in some bizarre, geological fairy-tale twist, said slice of Oceania has been made into an assortment of furniture pieces, all for our viewing as well as ergonomic pleasure.

Looking down onto each piece one feels as though they are flying high above the Earth’s oceans looking down watching the subtle shift of colours as they change from aquamarine to blue to turquoise. A perfect seascape which can only be fully captured and appreciated from on high.

But of course, this is not the work of nature at all. These acrylic beauties are the creations of Romanian sculptor and designer Eduard Locota. The layered acrylic DelMare Collection deftly crosses the line between sculpture, art and furniture. Using a special combination of acrylic glass, marble, Jesmonite and wood, the objects are truly one of a kind. Locota makes every sculpture by hand.

 

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

DelMare Furniture Collection by Eduard Locota | Yellowtrace

 

Locota clearly has an affinity with nature. Seascapes in particular. “They captivate with their representation of the primordial relationship between the solidity of rock and the fluidity of water,” said the designer.

He combines sculptural elements with artistic features, blurring the line between art and function. “I’ve always focused toward unparalleled results, practical abilities, high creativity and excellence. I specialise in out-of-the-box designs, that combines alternative materials and uses modern techniques to achieve artworks that exudes emotions,” he said.

Why acrylic instead of glass? Well in many ways it’s a perspective issue. Acrylic has less distortion than glass, and it’s tougher. But moreover, it’s the most transparent material known to man. And let’s face it, if you’re after a decent seascape you’re going to want to be able to see it clearly, to be able to gaze into it the way one does when looking at the sea. And that’s the feeling you get from Eduard Locota’s pieces – the feeling of minutes slipping by as you’re mesmerised by the ever-captivating depths of the ocean.

 

 


[Images courtesy of Eduard Locota.]

 

About The Author

Susanna McArdle
Contributor

Susanna has a background in Interior Architecture and a passion for writing. Based in Sydney, she has worked both in Asia and Australia designing. An avid writer, it’s hard to know what she prefers more, stringing words together or creating spaces. But one thing she does know, is that she loves doing the both together.

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