Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

 

Since it opened in 1571, London‘s Royal Exchange has been a hub for commerce in the heart of the city. Originally designed for trading stocks and later expanded to incorporate retail, it has been rebuilt three times, including the current 1844 version. These rich layers of history were the starting point for Royal Exchange Grind, a chic espresso and cocktail bar housed within the historic building. The project evolves the minimalist design language Melbourne-based studio Biasol has developed with the founders of Grind & Co., for their other locations throughout London (Shoreditch, Soho, Holborn, Covent Gardens and London Bridge).

The building’s imposing neoclassical facade is characterised by arching six-metre-high windows that flood the space with light. The clean lines and elegant materiality of the new interior were designed to accentuate the tenancy’s heritage elements. To develop the interior scheme, Biasol worked with a local heritage architect who guided the team through the site’s history. Century-old floorboards were restored underfoot, so designers employed the same herringbone pattern in the marble wall tiles to line the space.

“In developing the interior for this project, we wanted it to feel more like a bar than a cafe. The materials and colour palette extend this idea of refined, simple elegance, perfect for the area’s affluent clientele,” explain the designers.

 

Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Royal Exchange Grind by Biasol: Design Studio | Yellowtrace

 

The timeless material palette reflects the project’s context – located in a bustling commercial district alongside high-end boutiques, the cafe attracts a sophisticated clientele. A sleek Carrara marble counter is paired with matt brass foot rails and hooks. Behind the bar, bespoke display shelving continues the brass theme, with bedknob-topped rods capturing a certain nostalgia. The service space was designed to enable quick takeaway orders, while still offering comfortable dine-in options for those with a little time to linger.

The lightness of the interior fitout is also manifested in the furniture choices. White three-legged stools with peacock-green upholstery from Danish design house Menu line-up along the marble bench that gazes out the windows onto the busy London street scene. Up above, a playful and ironic neon artwork captures the Beatles’ immortal spirit – “Money can’t buy me love.”

 

 


[Images courtesy of Biasol: Design Studio. Photography by Paul Winch-Furness.]

 

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4 Responses

  1. Sewniptuck

    What a stunning reincarnation of heritage. I love that stuff gets used in the present day but appeals to our senses here and now. Yay for Melb/Aussie designers and congrats.

    Reply

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