Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 11

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 09

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 08

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 15

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 16

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 17

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 20

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 26

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 23

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 28

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 29

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 25

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 30

 

“I was so excited when the client told me they bought a site in Flinders. All I could picture in my head was the amazing clifftop location with views to the ocean until I googled the address and the reality hit,” says Albert Mo, director of Melbourne practice Architects EAT.

Albert’s excitement bubble burst as he discovered the inland corner block, some 500 meters from the village shops, bounded by a local path to access the back beach.

“Opposite to my dream clifftop location, the site is really, really flat,” jokes Albert. Not the most riveting start to the project, but as you and I both know, from the biggest challenges come the greatest triumphs, and Bellows House is just that.

The fact that the clients were a family Albert and his team worked with previously was a significant advantage. Having designed their city home seven years prior meant the trust was already there, so the architect focused on bringing his A-game.

Albert wanted a permanent house anchored in the sand from the outset, unlike the predictable light-weight beach vernacular. “More like a bunker than a shack,” he says, setting out to design a building that spoke of its location and sat in dialogue with the street. “The idea of frustum pyramids was stuck from the beginning”, he says.

 

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Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 35

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 38

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 27

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 32

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 34

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 33

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Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 42

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 44

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 45

 

The formal entry sequence starts from the pedestrian gate. Dusty pink brick pavers are the conduit between the native garden by Jim Fogarty Design and the built structure. Through the gap between the long façade and the garage, an outdoor shower precedes the inner outdoor sanctum connected to the living spaces.

Once inside, the two largest frustum roofs reveal their internal structure. Boomshakalaka – what a moment! The gobsmacking reverse step concrete pyramids allow plenty of natural light to the living and dining areas via the central skylights.

Exposed blockwork walls and concrete floors dominate the interior – with concrete blocks used to create shelves and light fittings too. Accents of timber joinery and brick bring an element of warmth and visual contrast – but otherwise, this is one hard-edged interior. Yet the overall effect is incredibly welcoming, comfortable and more than a little cool.

 

Related: Fitzroy Loft by Architects EAT.

 

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Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 48

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Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 54

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 04

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 05

Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 07

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Architects Eat Bellows Beach House Flinders Masonry Architecture Photo Derek Swalwell Yellowtrace 60

 

Apart from fantastic furniture and lighting choices by Architects EAT, Albert attributes a lot of the success of the interior to Swee Lim of Swee Design, who worked with the client on the art selection. Swee chose various ready-made artworks and sculptures directly from the artists and galleries, also commissioning several art pieces for the project.

“Perhaps because this is the second home we’ve done together, the client gave me more latitude to ‘experiment’,” says Albert, humbly. “I wanted a house that offered a sense of escape, where kids can remember their summer holidays as they grow up. A house that is memorable and describable.”

While this home wasn’t blessed with spectacular clifftop ocean views like the architect initially imagined, its inland location prompted a design response focused on placemaking. The locals now affectionately refer to it as the “Pyramids of Flinders”.

 

 

 


[Images and drawings courtesy of Architects EAT. Art consultancy by Swee Design. Photography by Derek Swalwell.]

 

About The Author

Founder & Editor

Dana is an award-winning interior designer and the founder and editor of Yellowtrace. With an unhealthy passion for design, she commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier events enable Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Design Strategy, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places & experiences.

One Response

  1. Ario

    Cool! Some aspects of the design — the successive rectilinear moldings, especially — remind me of Carlo Scarpa’s work.

    Reply

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