The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

 

This minimalist dream is the brainchild of Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos and is located in metropolitan Guadalajara, Mexico. This house is a bold statement by the designer on creating introspective living which shouts loudly that it does not wish to be ignored. Whilst this would not be everyone’s cup of tea in terms of a ‘home’, it is undeniably beautiful and arguably a stunning example of truly contemporary and self-assured design. The white, rendered cube is something that has become a bit of a trademark for this particular designer, and it’s hard to deny that they execute it perfectly.

Split over four levels, the enclosed cube sits comfortably raised from the ground on an earthy, stone plinth. The family home has a deceptively light and airy interior which is quite the opposite of the exterior impression. Built to be defensive, private and strong in appearance, this house protects the privacy of its inhabitants whilst also providing security. On entering the building, the most striking feature has to be the tree which grows in its double height atrium, a piece of nature within a pristine man-made environment. Whilst offering a splash of colour and texture to the internal spaces, this also ties the two levels it spans together by providing a unifying focal point.

 

Related Post: Stories On Design // Trees in Interiors.

 

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

The Cave House in Mexico by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos | Yellowtrace

 

The very simple and stripped back palette of marble with white walls is dominant throughout, with only break to this approach being a striking timber that features on selected doors and to the floors of the bedrooms. This design choice brings a touch of warmth to a design that seeks to be as restrained and uniform as possible. With the façade being predominantly solid with few openings to the outside, light is instead maximised with huge glazed elements to the rear of the property facing onto a secluded walled balcony. This approach gives the white internal faces a critical purpose in bouncing and reflecting light gains to all corners of the building.

A now common feature of numerous urban homes is the need to increase privacy and create an escape from the intensity of city living. This example demonstrates how this escape and solitude can be achieved, without a reduction in quality of space and avoiding a claustrophobic feeling for the inhabitants.

The name like ‘The Cave’ is one that conjures up images of dark, damp, depressing spaces. I’m sure we can all agree that this project is the absolute polar opposite.

 

Related Post: Stories On Design // The Art of Giving Good White.

 

 


[Images courtesy of Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos. Photography © César Béjar.]

 

About The Author

Rachel Maude
Contributor

Rachel is originally from the north of the England where she studied and lived for the majority of her life. After qualifying as an Architect and working in London for a number of years, she made the move to Melbourne in the search of a new adventure. Her work to date has covered a range of sectors and scales, and although a lover of all things design, her passion and expertise lay in smaller scale residential projects and seeing them through to completion. An environmentalist at heart, she has a keen interest in sustainability and minimising mankind's impact on the planet. When not fulfilling her designing duties, if the sun is shining you will find Rachel outdoors - always eager to explore new places by foot or pedal power (whilst also topping up her tan!).

2 Responses

  1. Johnb

    I made a response to this article, but for some unknown reason my comments were not published. Is there something devious and selective going on here?

    Reply

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