La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

Exhibition view of  solo installation by Romain Crelier.
La Mise en Abîme at the Abbey- church of Bellelay, Switzerland, July 2013
Images © wfw

 

Text & images by Sophie Yerly for Yellowtrace. Find out more about Sophie after the post.

At the Bellelay Abbey (Abbatiale de Bellelay), lost in deepest darkest Switzerland, a mesmerizing installation of Romain Crelier’s work is on display until September 16th. Crelier is a Swiss artist who explores many techniques, amongst them beautifully ghostly reflections.

Entitled La Mise en Abîme (French for “placed into abyss”), the installation comprises two large, extremely precise and impeccably finished receptacles in which vast quantities of used oil are contained. Crelier chooses to use recycled liquid because he considers the large-scale work to be ironic creations of “monochrome paintings using a despised substance.”

 

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

La Mise en Abîme Installation by Romain Crelier at Abbey-church of Bellelay, Switzerland | Yellowtrace.

Exhibition view of  solo installation by Romain Crelier.
La Mise en Abîme at the Abbey- church of Bellelay, Switzerland, July 2013
Images © wfw

 

Shaped like giant puddles, the sculptures with their shiny, and lacquer surfaces (thanks to the expressive properties of oil) reflect the surrounding, allowing the viewers to interact with the architecture of the church by being pulled into the reflection so that they, in turn, become part of the sculpture itself. The installation not only dispenses multiple visual thrills and mysteries but also offers a moment where sculpture creates another reading of space.

La Mise en Abîme by Romain Crelier
Bellelay Abbey, Switzerland
June 22, 2013 – September 16, 2013

 


Sophie Yerly is a new friend of Yellowtrace. She is based in Basel and runs a beautiful art blog We Find Wildness.

How should I introduce myself… How should I introduce my blog ? Well, may be the best thing is to start at the beginning: I started the blog in November of 2008, with the aim to communicate and to share the creatives delights that I stumbled upon in a new medium, and above all, I was looking for a way to have fun. Since then, I never get tired of publishing, I have met tons of creative people, I have seen incredible things and I’ve taken too many photos!

Connect with Sophie via her Blog | Twitter | Tumblr


[All images © wfw.]

 

About The Author

Dana Tomić Hughes
Founder & Editor
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Dana is an award-winning interior designer living in Sydney, Australia. With an unhealthy passion for design, Dana commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier design events, enables Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Nick Hughes, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Interior Design, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places.

One Response

  1. Barock Photographic Installation by Renate Buser | Yellowtrace

    […] In 1714, architect Franz Beer built the Abbey church of Bellelay. Enormous pilasters, decorated with lavish ornamentation, monumental emptiness and a fascinating play of light still captivate 300 years later. The foundation of the church is dedicated to the appreciation of this baroque monument. Every year in the summer months, the church hosts an exhibition of contemporary art of Swiss artists. To mark the anniversary, Basel-based artist Renate Buser presented photographic installation “Barock” – photographed elements of architecture printed on oversized canvases in the incredible baroque setting of the abbey. The architecture of the exhibition space is it’s real subject. Renate Buser’s approach engages with shifting scales and in doing so creates trompe l’oeil-like illusions. The images celebrate architectural elements from different angles, creating a playful dialogue with the volumes and distances. This realistic imagery is then presented amongst the columns and the arches throughout the rooms – challenging the very perception of the space, while proportions trick the eye providing an immersive and cinematic experience. “The tension between photography and architecture for me is that they contain different temporalities. The ‘content’ of my work reveals itself in the simultaneous experience of real space, which is in constant movement and change, and fictitious space. There is no ‘correct’ location, as there is no photo showing everything”,  explains the artist. Related Post: La mise En Abîme by Romain Crelier at Bellelay Abbey // Switzerland. […]

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