Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Flora Danica at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace
Flora Danica Restaurant at Maison du Danemark Paris. Photography by Heidi Lerkenfeldt.

 

A stone’s throw from the Arc de Triomphe on Paris’ incomparable Avenue des Champs-Élysées is La Maison du Danemark, a cultural institute opened in 1955 that promotes Danish arts and culture within Paris. Originally built in 1935, the historical building was in need of a makeover and the Danish-Italian design duo GamFratesi won the tender to renovate the prestigious interiors.

In what was one of their biggest projects to date, GamFratesi embraced a number of Danish brands and their iconic products, such as Louis Poulsen, Lightyears, Gubi, Carl Hansen, Brdr. Petersens, expressing a combination of contemporary and classic Danish design and philosophy. Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi‘s involvement extended from the general interior, all the way through to furniture and tableware selections, having designed a special series for Royal Copenhagen, combined with some tableware from Frama.

Well considered and rich with colour and texture, the fit out oozes elegance and is, in my opinion, total perfection! The two restaurants – Flora Danica and Copenhague – are both housed within La Maison Du Danemark, communicating two different personalities and fusing elements of the past and present.

Flora Danica is a contemporary brasserie headed by Chef Guillaume Leray that celebrates Danish cuisine with sophisticated French touches. Located on the ground floor and courtyard of La Maison du Danemark, the space offers an abundance of natural light and evokes a strong connection with nature. Awash with the rich tones of green, the space is comprised of Herringbone marble floors (both Carrara and green), an expansive marble bar, lush plants and a large wall display of traditional Flora Danica drawings. This palette is offset by shades of grey as well as black and brass detailing. Representing Nordic and Art Deco influences, GamFratesi collaborated with Danish design house Gubi to design develop new products including the TS Dining Table. The new furniture will be a part of Gubi’s permanent collection and will be launched at the 2017 Stockholm Furniture Fair.

 

See more projects by GamFratesi on Yellowtrace.

 

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace

Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark in Paris by GamFratesi | Yellowtrace
Copenhague Restaurant at Maison du Danemark Paris. Photography by Heidi Lerkenfeldt.

 

Located on the first floor of La Maison du Danemark is Copenhague, a more formal restaurant where Chef Andreas Møller prepares unique Scandinavian specialties. Now one of the most popular restaurants in Paris, Copenhague offers creative cuisine, spectacular views and a fit-out that’s to die for! Unlike Flora Danica, Copenhague is draped in darker, more intense colours and textures. The walls are lined with Gubi’s Cobra Lamps while the large-scale mirrors are based on the same design concept as their TS Collection.

I have this strange idea that dark or navy blues and black don’t go together. I don’t know where this aversion came from but I think it stems from my grandfather who touted “thou shall not wear black shoes with a blue suit”. I’m not even sure if that’s a thing. Anyway, fashion is one thing because the combination of blue and black in this fit-out is oh so good! I’m happy to be proven wrong in this case where the two tones create an intense and beguiling impression. Dark blue leather, Raf Simons for Kvadrat textiles and deep blue curtains and tablecloths bring the visitors deep into an intimate atmosphere. The only touch of white is a series of white porcelain plates that are a collaboration with Royal Copenhagen and GamFratesi.

It’s clear that our favourites GamFratesi have done it again. With their dual traditional background, Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi have created furniture and spaces that respectfully reflect tradition while also emphasise unique stories, symbols and associations. The newly renovated interior at La Maison du Danemark combines a wonderful fusion of modern Danish elegance with a refined French influence. C’est magnifique!

 

See more projects by GamFratesi on Yellowtrace.

 

 


[Images courtesy of GamFratesi. Photography by Heidi Lerkenfeldt.]

 

About The Author

Fenina Acance
Contributor

Architecting away in Melbourne, Fenina is a shameless fashion, art and design fanatic who loves defying the relentless Melbournian uniform of black on black on black. Often spotted strutting a boisterous mix of pattern and colour, her eclectic love for the bold, raw and textured fuels her passion for design and contemporary art. When not indulging in Cy Twombly’s sensitive scribbles or Serra’s evocative sculptural forms, her love for everything Italian consumes the rest of her time. Whether it’s the language, design or food (especially food), Fenina is obsessed!

2 Responses

  1. Mikkel Lindhard

    As beautiful as it may look, and it does, it just looks like just another Hotel/Bar and not something that Denmark is famous for and what makes it stand out from the crowd.

    Looks like the Architect didn’t have free hands.

    Reply

Leave a Reply