• Christopher Rimmer’s Haunting Images of Abandoned Towns Buried by Sand.


    Posted on 13th February, by Team Yellowtrace in photography. 1 Comment

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

     

    Christopher Rimmer is a Melbourne-based fine art photographer who’s forthcoming exhibition, Sign of Life, is a visual examination of the tragedy of two abandoned towns slowly being buried by the sands. The images were shot on location in the diamond mining towns of Elizabeth Bay and Kolmanskop in South Western Namibia. Local institutions such as the hospital, ballroom, power station, theatre, casino, ice factory and the first x-ray-station in the Western Hemisphere are all shown in a surreal and almost unrecognisable state.

    Driven by the enormous wealth of the first diamond miners, the two towns were once the symbol of prosperity and growth. The residents built both villages in the architectural style of German towns. After World War II, diamonds were found more plentiful elsewhere and the last resident moved away in 1951.

     

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

    Sign of Life by Christopher Rimmer | Yellowtrace

     

    A melancholic atmosphere pervades what remains of both towns. The encroaching desert sands that fill some of the buildings to the ceiling, combined with worn interiors and the patina of once brightly painted walls, combine to create a truly unique environment of baffling beauty.

    Can’t get enough? See more images in the gallery below. Rimmer’s ’Sign of Life’ series will be exhibited during 2014.

    Check out more posts about Abandoned Buildings on Yellowtrace. 

     


    [Images courtesy of Christopher Rimmer.]

     





  • One Response to “Christopher Rimmer’s Haunting Images of Abandoned Towns Buried by Sand.”

    1. Ari says:

      Like an architectural memento mori.

      They sort of confound scale expectations too, the sand somehow looks like huge dunes, perhaps the buildings are even bigger and people are no larger than the keyholes.

      Beautiful, thank you.



    From The Blog.

    Hey there good lookin'! Check out some of the recent posts from the blog. Proudly brought to you by Yellowtrace. Word.

    Manifesto // Nucleo Retrospective in Paris.

    The Italian Institute of Culture in Paris presents the first important retrospective on Nucleo, the Italian art and design collective led by Piergiorgio Robino....
    Video // Joseph Dirand’s Paris Apartment.

    A home tour of architect Joseph Dirand's luxuriously minimal Paris apartment where he discusses his preference for function over form in decoration.
    Bureau Betak’s Knockout Mirrored Installation for Felipe Oliveira Baptista.

    The genius that is Alexandre De Betak of Bureau Betak strikes again (and again). This time with a knockout mirrored kaleidoscopic installation for Portuguese...