Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series One-to-One, 2012. Materials consist of wood with dimensions of 11 x 24 x 3 cm.

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series One-to-One, 2012. Materials consist of wood with dimensions of 13 x 9 x 1 cm.

 

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series Landscape Multiple, 2013. Reworked second hand ceramics. Dimensions of 52 x 42 x 7 cm. Collection Röhsska Museum, Gothenburg.

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series Landscape Multiple, 2012. Reworked second hand ceramics.

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series Landscape Multiple, 2009. Reworked second hand ceramics.

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series Gone Fishing, 2009. Reworked second hand ceramics.

 

Timber & Ceramic Sculptures by Caroline Slotte | Yellowtrace

From the series Unidentified View, 2009. Reworked second hand ceramics, sandblasted, sculpted and sanded down using a rotary tool, final sanding by hand. Collection The West Norway Museum of Decorative Art, Bergen.

 

 

Helsinki-based Caroline Slotte has built an art career by reworking second hand objects and giving the old materials a new life. “The poetry of everyday objects, with all the memories and associations that these objects contain” is the starting point for her artistic practice. She manipulates found materials, primarily ceramic everyday items, so that they take on new meanings. The tensions between the recognisable and the enigmatic, the ordinary and the unexpected are recurring thematics of her work.

‘One-to-one’ series features a set of sculptures that confuses our visual perception of material. Using solely timber, she creates miniature sculptures in the shape of objects such as a drinking straw, twisted house key or a squashed aluminium can, which we simultaneously recognise as metal, plastic or paper depending on their shape. “This confusion makes them into a material impossibility, a miracle,” she explains.

In her series ‘Unidentified View’, ‘Landscape Multiple’, and ‘Gone Fishing’, Slotte’s canvas is the dinner plate. She re-works ceramics by cutting directly into them, by sculpting and sanding, and by combining elements from different objects – her way of leading the viewer to question the material and highlighting the stories embedded within the objects. Isn’t this such an elegant way to highlight stories contained in old china, as it sits silent and half-forgotten in the cupboard? Love.

Related Post: Hanna Krüger Transforms Rosenthal Porcelain into Lamps & Vases.

 


[Images courtesy of Caroline Slotte.]

 

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8 Responses

  1. Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte | Content inspirations

    […] Helsinki-based artist Caroline Slotte manipulates artwork found on acquired antique ceramics to create layered landscapes and isolated images. One of her most striking bodies of work titled Landscape Multiple involves a process of carving and sanding through stacked dinner plates to create new, unexpected landscapes. From her artist statement: The reworking of second hand objects play a pivotal role in Caroline Slotte´s practice. She manipulates found materials, primarily ceramic everyday items, so that they take on new meanings. The tensions between the recognizable and the enigmatic, the ordinary and the unexpected are recurring thematic concerns. More recent explorations reveal an expanded interest in material perception and material recognition, teasing out situations where the initial visual identification fails resulting in an unsettling state of material confusion. Demonstrating an engaged sensitivity towards the associations, memories and narratives inherent in the objects, Slotte´s intricate physical interventions allows us to see things we would otherwise not have seen. What you see here is just a sample of Slotte’s work, head over to her website to see all of these pieces close up, and also check out her wood sculptures. Slotte had several additional pieces on view earlier this year at Kunstnerforbundet Gallery in Oslo. (via Yellowtrace) […]

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