Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

 

Located in an industrial Swedish town famed for its ceramic production, Petra Gipp Architects’ (PGA) Bruksgården project is a testament to the nature of industry past, present and future. Transforming the lavish yet aged factory manager’s residence, PGA transformed this heritage-listed beauty into a new office for Lindéngruppen. Specialising in the long-term development of industrial companies, it’s only fitting that their new offices express narrative through a delicate composition of form and materiality. Always driving Bruksgården’s architectural x-factor beautifully beyond its heritage constraints.

Composed of three distinct forms, Bruksgården creates a journey from old to new. Internally renovated, the existing building represents the past whilst a floating white box containing the new office space represents the present and future. Connecting the two is a form inspired by the traditional building typology called the ‘longhouse’. Combining a pitched roof, charcoal coloured brick and cast concrete, this third form appears to rise out of its context like a vertical extension of the cobbled pathways that surround it. Loving the representation and respect given to context.

 

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

Bruksgården in Höganäs, Sweden by Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Yellowtrace

 

Furthermore, PGA have used timber to delicately emphasise key elements of the building. From the internal window frames, to the external paneling, to the sculptural stair, timber offsets the building’s otherwise cool material palette and creates a sense of warmth throughout.

Along this curated journey, a narrative-based art collection mimics the formal composition of the building and its tactile and sculptural materiality. Also dissolving the divide between interior and exterior, the collection extends into a beautifully landscaped courtyard, engaging the broader city block and showcasing this re-vamped historic building to the public.

Architectural gems like this should never been hidden away. Total respect.

 

 


[Photography by Jens Markus Lindhe.]

 

About The Author

Samuel Dowleysmith
Contributor

Originally from Melbourne, Sam is a design-crazed architect currently living and working in Copenhagen, Denmark. Nuts for all things futurist and technology based, he is super interested in the evolving relationship between design/ architecture and the process of industrialised production - probably derived from childhood ambitions to make his own, personalised R2D2. Totally crazy about concepts like self-assembling architectures, Sam gets an unreal kick out of trying to understand the complexities behind any design. In his limited, non-design time he is currently learning Danish and practicing it shamelessly with the poor coffee barista down the road twice a day, every day.

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