Today’s unusual post features Japanese artist Baku Maeda and his killer moustache. Based in Sapporo, an illustrator by trade, Baku Maeda expresses tremendous energy and power with his work, showing us what’s possible to achieve with humble, unassuming materials like ice and ribbon. Maeda is a classic doodler – but be sure to look between the lines here so you don’t miss a thing.

 

Longing For Spring by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Longing For Spring by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Longing For Spring by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

“Longing for Spring @ Sapporo” by Baku Maeda. Photos by Syusaku Nagahama.

 

Using a hard chisel and small ice as a design medium, Maeda creates quirky wearable ice sculptures built to withstand the frigid temperatures of his home town.

“The low temperature is 6.8°F. The city of Sapporo has been covered heavily with snow for five month. It is long winter. For creating an ice mask, I froze the water with cold air for two days. Contrary to the coldness, it melts slowly and changes beautifully the expression that I represent. This work of art “Longing for Spring” lets you feel a sense of warmth in a land of extreme cold.”



Ice Glasses by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ice Glasses by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ice Glasses by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

“Ice Glasses” by Baku Maeda.

 

More ridiculously amusing work by Baku Maeda is his encased eyeglass frames in ice to create humorous but probably not very practical “ice glasses.” They weren’t created for any particular reason other than artistic expression, so you won’t be able to get yourself a pair at Sunglass Hut anytime soon.

 

Ribbonesia Masks by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ribbonesia Masks by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ribbonesia Masks by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ribbonesia Masks (2013) by Baku Maeda.

Ribbonesia by Baku Maeda | Yellowtrace

Ribbonesia Animal Sculpture (2010) by Baku Maeda.

 

The world was first introduced to the series Ribbonesia by Baku Maeda back in 2010, as he explored ribbon and other materials to create more 3-dimensional and sculptural works. Since creating a zoo of simple adorable animal characters out of ribbons, he has gone on to make much more intricate designs. Still working in the vein of such creatures with the same material and under the same name, the Japanese artist has created a collection of intricate masks made entirely out of ribbons. Don’t these creatures look like something for a masquerade ball or a secret fraternity meeting? So mysterious. Sign me up.




[Images Courtesy of Baku MaedaRibbonesia. Photography for “Longing for Spring” courtesy of Syusaku Nagahama.]

 

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  1. Pattern Pulp - Friday Quick Links!

    […] sailboat installation via The Jealous Curator 6. Baku Maeda’s striking Ribbonesia Masks via Yellowtrace 7. DIY Moroccan inspired pendant lamp via design*sponge 8. Wind up art by Echo Yang via Colossal 9. […]

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